Evidence-Based Programs for Young Parents in Foster Care

Posted October 16, 2017, By the Annie E. Casey Foundation

A webinar from the Annie E. Casey Foundation explores approaches that are designed to engage young people — specifically young people who have experienced foster care — on the topic of preventing unintended or untimely pregnancies.

The 90-minute webinar, Pregnancy Prevention and Parenting Support, focuses on evidenced-based, research-informed strategies and highlights ways to help young parents who are tending to their own developmental needs while in foster care.

“It is critical that child welfare systems equip themselves with evidence-based tools to help them delay unplanned, untimely or rapid repeat pregnancies,” says Tammi Fleming, senior associate at the Casey Foundation, who moderated the webinar. “At the same time, we must ensure that young people who are expecting or already parenting have access and opportunities to pursue their life goals and strengthen their parenting skills.”

During the webinar, three child welfare experts joined Fleming, who leads Casey’s pregnancy prevention and parenting support portfolio within the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. These experts are:

  • Molly Casey
    Administrator for Teen Parent Connection, a program in Georgia that serves pregnant teens and teen parents (and their children) who are in state custody. Teen Parent Connection is an initiative of the Multi-Agency Alliance for Children, a Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative site.
     
  • Sabine Chery
    Assistant Commissioner for New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services, which provides child welfare, juvenile justice and early care and education services to New York City’s children and families.
     
  • Sarah Morrison
    Director of Learning and Evidence for the Center for the Study of Social Policy, a national nonprofit devoted to securing equal opportunities and better futures for all children and families, especially those most often left behind.

Watch the webinar